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Calls for Papers

  • CFP: Call for SHERA-sponsored Session Proposals

    CFP: Call for SHERA-sponsored Session Proposals

    SHERA invites our members to submit session proposals for a SHERA-sponsored session at the Society of Architectural Historians SAH 72nd Annual International Conference in Providence RI, April 24-28, 2019. Session proposals should be submitted to the SHERA Board at: [shera.artarchitecture@gmail.com] (shera.artarchitecture@gmail.com) by SHERA deadline - December 10, 2017, and should comply with the instructions found below in the SAH Call for Sessions. The chair (co-chairs) of the selected proposal will be notified ASAP, for timely submission on the SAH website.

    The individual proposing a SHERA-sponsored session must follow the same selection process for SAH conference sessions proposed by organizations as those proposed by individuals. Acceptance is not guaranteed. A Conference session selected by SAH Conference Committee is considered an academic achievement. Session proposals must include the following elements:

    1. A session title not longer than 65 characters, including spaces and punctuation
    2. Summary of the subject and the premise in no more than 500 words
    3. Name, professional affiliation (if applicable), address, telephone, and email address (if your session is sponsored by SHERA, you also have to become a SAH member, and ensure that the information you are providing matches an existing SAH profile/membership account to avoid misdirecting communications.
    4. A current CV (2 pages maximum) Although the SAH membership is international, the annual conference is conducted in English. Therefore, all session proposals must be submitted in English and, if accepted, conducted in English.

    SAH Call for Sessions SAH 2019 Annual International Conference

    www.sah.org/conferences-and-programs/2019-conference—-providence

    SAH Submission Deadline: January 16, 2018, at 5 pm CST.

    The Society of Architectural Historians will offer a total of 36 paper sessions at its 2019 Annual International Conference in Providence, Rhode Island. The Society invites its members, including graduate students and independent scholars, representatives of SAH chapters and partner organizations, to chair a session at the conference. As SAH membership is required to chair or present research at the annual conference, non-members who wish to chair a session will be required to join SAH next August 2018 when conference registration opens for Session Chairs and Speakers.  
    Since the principal purpose of the SAH annual conference is to inform attendees of the general state of research in architectural history and related disciplines, session proposals covering every time period and all aspects of the built environment, including landscape and urban history, are encouraged.

    Sessions may be theoretical, methodological, thematic, interdisciplinary, pedagogical, revisionist or documentary in premise and ambition and have broadly conceived or more narrowly focused subjects. Sessions that embrace cross-cultural, transnational and/or non-Western topics are particularly welcome. In every case, the subject should be clearly defined in critical and historical terms.

    Since late submissions cannot be considered, it is recommended that proposals be submitted well before the deadline. Last-minute submissions that fail posting in the online portal or are sent in error via email cannot be considered. Only proposals submitted through the online portal can be considered.     To ensure broad participation in the SAH Annual International Conference, individuals are limited to the role of either a session chair OR a speaker. If you are selected as a session chair you may not submit a paper abstract to other sessions to be considered for speaking.
    Each Session Chair and Speaker is expected to fund his or her own travel and related expenses to participate in the conference. A copy of the Session Chair and Speaker Agreement that includes deadlines and step-by-step processes will be distributed to both Session Chairs and Speakers. Session Chairs and Speakers are required to join SAH and pre-register for the conference starting in August 2018.

    SAH Key Dates October 03, 2017, 3 pm CDT - Call for sessions opens January 16, 2018, 5 pm CST - Deadline to submit a session proposal February 23, 2018 - Session selection notification March 9, 2018, 5 pm CDT - Revised session proposals due April 3, 2018, 3 pm CDT - Call for papers opens June 5, 2018, 5 pm CDT - Deadline to submit a paper abstract June 7, 2018 - Session Chairs start reviewing paper submissions July 13, 2018 - Session Chairs make final selection of papers and notify speakers August 1, 2018 - Session Chair & Speaker registration opens September 27, 2018 - Session Chair & Speaker registration closes

  • CFP: Masters: Women in Art and Architecture

    Call for Papers

    In response to Call for Proposals, CAA 106th Annual Conference, Los Angeles CA, February 21–24, 2018 http://www.collegeart.org/programs/conference/, we are composing a Complete Session Proposal “Masters: Women in Art and Architecture” focused on presenting women-architects and artists, women-makers and educators, hidden or forgotten in collective histories. This session is critical to bridging professional readings and analyzing professional settings for women architects and artists across borders and cultural divides. We are interested in papers that explore and examine views of gender bias within art and architectural practices across varying cultures, and how this historiography is recorded. We welcome studies on the ways art and architectural education address the gender space and reflect on practitioners, in particular related to craftsmanship and production, and in response to women’s professional strategies as they impact new generations. We invite theoretically, historically, and ethnographically grounded contributions that fill blind spots and explore the life of masters: women in art and architecture.

    Please submit your Paper Title and Abstract (up to 200 words); your Name; Affiliation (for institutional affiliation, enter institution’s official name as it appears on the institution’s website and avoid acronyms or colloquial titles. Do not list department, faculty positions, graduate student status, or titles. You may enter “Independent Scholar,” “Independent Artist,” etc. if not affiliated with a particular institution); CAA Member ID; and Email by April 12, 2017, 5pm ET, to sokolina@sbcglobal.net and vtdesign@sover.net.

  • CFP: Groups, Coteries, Circles and Guilds. Modernist Aesthetics and the Utopian Lure of Community

    Groups, Coteries, Circles and Guilds. Modernist Aesthetics and the Utopian Lure of Community

    While Modernism, especially literary Modernism, has long been investigated in the wake of the primary role played by individual voices and authorship, critical studies increasingly pay attention to the roles played by group artistry in the elaboration of avant-garde and modernist aesthetics and ethics, and to collaborative efforts bringing together writers, artists and intellectuals, creating at times not just cosmopolitan, but actively transnational communities.

    Collective experiences (circles, little magazines, theatre companies, guilds) challenged the consolidated idea of authorship and creation and are crucial for understanding the writing practices in the first half of the twentieth century. They also very often operated internationally, by either forging allegiances between authors from different national and cultural backgrounds, or by creating connections between single authors across national boundaries.

    In many ways, the utopia of new and unfettered forms of expression seems to go hand in hand with the experimentation of unconventional modes of living. Whether institutionalised or informal, most of these groupings, which were housed both in urban and rural surroundings, involved artists, authors and thinkers from different countries and cultures, working together in a collective attempt to reassess/reformulate the fundamental questions about art, creativity and craft in the light of communal practices and choices.

    The editor is seeking for contributions addressing the following topics in Modernist literature:

    • international and transnational circles, guilds and groups actively promoting utopian programs through artistic experiments and/or unconventional living practices
    • collaborations uniting artists and writers and fostering dialogue between experiments in both the modernist centres and their “margins”
    • collective writing practices challenging institutional perceptions concerning artistic production, authorship with broader political or social agendas

    Please send proposals to: Laura Scuriatti, Bard College, Berlin: l.scuriatti@berlin.bard.edu

  • CFP: 2017 ASEEES Convention, Chicago, Nov. 9-12

    49th ASEEES Annual Convention
    November 9-12, 2017
    Chicago Marriot Downtown Magnificent Mile
    www.aseees.org/convention

    Convention Theme: Transgressions The 100th anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution inspires the 2017 theme, and invites us to rethink the ways in which cultural, economic, political, social, and international orders are undermined, overthrown, and recast. The theme invites consideration of transgressions broadly and comparatively. Proposals need not be related to the theme. Proposals from all disciplines, historical periods, and geographic foci are welcome.

    February 15 Deadline for all convention proposal submissions & meeting requests

    Accepting submissions for:

    Panels Roundtables Book Discussion Roundtables (New for 2017 – Use the Roundtable submission process) Individual Papers Lightning Round Presentations (New for 2017 – See the call for proposal for details) For more information on the Call for Proposals see: www.aseees.org/convention/cfp

    Please review the rules for participation: www.aseees.org/convention/rules

    We are anticipating a large number of proposals for the 2017 Convention. Individual paper submissions will have a MUCH LOWER chance of being accepted than panel/roundtable proposals. We STRONGLY encourage all interested participants to form, or become part of, a panel proposal. To assist in the process of forming panels, we have created the Panel/Paper Wanted Board. If you are looking for a panel to join or a paper presenter for your panel, please review the proposals on the online board. You can also indicate your willingness to volunteer as chair or discussant. You can also post your requests on the new ASEEES Commons: aseees.hcommons.org/groups/2017-convention-paper-panelist-wanted/ (you must be a current ASEEES member to post on the Commons).

  • CFP: Privacy Outside Its ‘Comfort Zone’: Late Socialist Eastern and East-Central Europe between the Private and the Public”, December 8-10, 2017, University of Passau, Germany Organizer: DFG Research Training Group 1681/2 “Privacy and Digitalization"

    CFP Conference “Privacy Outside Its ‘Comfort Zone’: Late Socialist Eastern and East-Central Europe between the Private and the Public”

    by Tatiana Klepikova Conference “Privacy Outside Its ‘Comfort Zone’: Late Socialist Eastern and East-Central Europe between the Private and the Public”, December 8-10, 2017

    Organizer: DFG Research Training Group 1681/2 “Privacy and Digitalization”, University of Passau, Germany

    “Privacy” is a well-researched yet highly disputed concept in Western scholarship. While most privacy research comes from and concentrates on Western liberal societies, great potential of privacy studies beyond this traditional framework still remains largely unexplored. The framework of Western liberal societies may therefore be seen not only as a “comfort zone” of privacy studies, but also as a barrier that often limits the potential of the research. This conference aims at elucidating the problems and the perspectives of privacy studies beyond the traditional liberal framework by bringing together scholars and PhD students who work on the concept of “privacy” in the context of Late Socialist Eastern and East-Central Europe.

    A common challenge to privacy researchers of non-Western societies, especially if they come from such a society, is to refute the erroneous misconception of the absence of “privacy” in non-liberal societies, and to embrace the constructions of “privacy” that these local societies offer. This conference endeavors to create a dialogue between scholars and PhD students from all fields of humanities and social and political sciences to discuss the challenges of transgressing the borders of liberal frameworks, the strategies to cope with these challenges, and the perspectives for privacy research that such transgressions offer.

    The use of this concept in the context of Late Socialist Eastern and East-Central Europe leads to a range of questions that challenge liberal dichotomies and pave the way for alternative visions of “privacy”. These questions are particularly resonant now, in the centennial year of the October Revolution, when its consequences are debated anew. While the liberal concept of “privacy” usually fails in the framework of authoritarian regimes of post-war Europe, the region offers a diversity of other impulses similar to the liberal idea of “privacy”. In the post-war years, Socialist Eastern and East-Central Europe witnessed the expansion of the material as well as immaterial private sphere, which did not only come as a result of the changed world order and subsequent transformations of Socialist societies, but can also be seen as a process that was meticulously planned, carried out, and controlled by the authorities of respective countries in an attempt to stabilize their regimes in the process of de-Stalinization. However, we should also consider whether the private sphere, so benevolently tolerated by Socialist states, continuously developed into an enfant terrible that nurtured not only stability, but also the disruptive forces of dissidence and civil rights movements, which ultimately undermined the Socialist bloc from within. These stabilizing and simultaneously disruptive currents of “privacy” within non-liberal societies are of particular interest, as they elucidate the multifaceted nature of this concept.

    Participants are therefore asked to revisit and question the concept of “privacy” in liberal contexts as well as within the frameworks of Late Socialist Eastern and East-Central Europe by renegotiating the underlying categories within a certain society. The conference will specifically examine ways of addressing the concepts of “privacy” and “publicity” in said contexts by debating the applicable frameworks and by challenging existing approaches. It will further explore the potential of “reverse applicability” by discussing how privacy research in liberal contexts can benefit from other frameworks of privacy—the transfer that is of particular interest now, in the “post-privacy age”, when Snowden’s revelations elucidated the approximations of Western liberal states to the authoritarian models of the past and the present. In the light of such developments, the examination of Late Socialist authoritarian societies becomes advantageous for our understanding of contemporary privacy paradigms.

    The conference will focus on three aspects of the problematics of the private/public dichotomy in Late Socialist societies of Eastern and Central Europe. Subtopics of interest include (but are not limited to):

    Political variations of privacy:

    Concepts of privacy: How does the liberal concept of privacy transform when applied beyond liberal societies? Is a proper transfer possible? Do we need renegotiations of the category?
    (Ab-)use of privacy: In what ways can privacy become instrumental to the aims of certain regimes?
    Challenging Western models: Is the “absence of privacy” to be spoken of only in the non-liberal context? How are non-Western models applicable to the Western world’s continuous failings at privacy in the 21st century?

    Art and privacy:

    Visions of privacy: How was privacy in Socialist societies portrayed by domestic as well as by international literature and cinema?
    “Niches of privacy”: How did the production and reception of art oscillate between the private and the public spheres?

    Privacy in Socialist societies:

    Fluid borders: Where do borders between the private and the public spheres lie in these societies? Which dichotomous, trichotomous, etc. divisions are imaginable?
    Functions of privacy: How do functions of privacy evolve in the Late Socialist societies of Eastern and Central Europe in comparison to the Western model? To what extent are such phenomena as dissidence and samizdat private/public?
    “The private is political”: In which way did Socialism “respond” to the feminist critique of liberal societies that addressed the reduction of the woman’s role to the private sphere and the depoliticization of the said sphere in the Western liberal states?
    Legal ambivalence: How was the private sphere constructed through Socialist laws? How did legal codes of Socialist states simultaneously allow for the invasion of privacy?

    Information for applicants:

    The conference will take place on December 8-10, 2017 at the University of Passau, Germany. The language of the conference is English. We welcome abstract submissions of individual papers (no more than 300 words) until February 28, 2017. Please include the title of your presentation, as well as a short academic CV (max. 150 words), and send us a PDF document at the following E-mail addresses, indicating “Conference Privacy 2017” as the E-mail subject: Lukas.Edeler@uni-passau.de AND Tatiana.Klepikova@uni-passau.de

    We will contribute to the accommodation and travel costs of the participants. The conference will be based on pre-circulated papers that should be submitted until October 1, 2017. We plan to assemble an edited volume on the basis of the conference proceedings.

    For any further questions, please contact Tatiana Klepikova Tatiana.Klepikova@uni-passau.de. For further information about the DFG Research Training Group, please address http://www.privatheit.uni-passau.de/en/.

  • CFP: Summoning the Archive

    CFP: Summoning the Archive:
    A Symposium on the Periodical, Printed Matter, and Digital Archiving at the Institute for Public Knowledge, New York University
    May 11-13, 2017

    Organizer: Meghan Forbes, NYU and UT-Austin Keynote Speaker: Jenna Freedman, Barnard

    The printing and distribution of the avant-garde magazine, illustrated weekly, and underground zine have developed in the twentieth century in tandem with technological advancements in printing and access to these technologies in various regions, gaining traction in different parts of the world at different times based on economic, social, and political conditions. At its best, the magazine is an efficient, relatively affordable (for both publisher and consumer) vehicle for the artists and intellectuals it represents, and has the capacity to innovate with new technologies and engage in pressing social, political, and artistic issues. This is even more true now, in the second decade of the twenty-first century, as we observe new models for content, design, and distribution of the periodical or magazine published on-line, which has the potential to involve an even wider audience, and host a variety of multi-media content. The magazine thus continues to be a leading platform for social and political engagement, and artistic innovation.

    Corresponding to a turn towards the digital, the field of Periodical Studies has gained traction as it situates the magazine as a cultural product that incorporates text, image, and graphic design toward various political, social, artistic, and pedagogical ends. With large scale projects dedicated to digitizing print based magazines, such as the Blue Mountain project at Princeton University or the Modernist Journals Project at Brown, and a concurrent turn towards digital mapping and data visualization, periodicals that were once sequestered in the archive now have the capacity to reach a wider audience, and make visible previously overlooked networks and connections enacted within and across the magazines.

    The Symposium on the Periodical, Printed Matter, and Digital Archiving, to be held at the Institute for Public Knowledge at NYU invites publishers, editors, artists, and scholars from the Social Sciences and Humanities to come together around various methodologies and archival practices, and explore the following topics and questions:

    • Politics of language and translation in multilingual or internationally circulated publications.
    • Trans-networks: serial print culture as an intersectional axis for place, culture, genre, language, race, gender, sexuality.
    • Does printed matter “translate” digitally?
    • How does the library intervene in its archived periodicals through systems of cataloging, binding, and preservation? How does this affect the accessibility of these collections for researchers?
    • Gaps in the archive: what periodicals and other printed ephemera have been left out? What can be done to source and preserve historical periodicals originally not held in collections?
    • Likewise, what historical print magazines have not been digitized? What geographic- linguistic regions, gender, cultural, religious, and racial orientations are neglected?
    • Effective strategies for making visible and accessible digitized collections through Open Source platforms, as well as data visualization and digital mapping projects. Distant versus close reading strategies. Possible pedagogical applications.
    • The role and relevance of the print-based mag in our highly digital moment.
    • How does the digital magazine correspond with or subvert the conception of periodical as a material product and cultural form?
    • How do zines, comics, and avant-garde publications resist the potential for the periodical to be simply an inevitable by-product of consumerist, capitalist culture? Do they?

    All panels and the keynote address will be held at the Institute for Public Knowledge at New York University. Site visits to relevant periodical collections at the New York Public Library and Barnard Zine Library, as well as the library of the Museum of Modern Art, have also been arranged.

    Those interested in participating should submit a CV and abstract of no more than 300 words by e-mail with the subject heading: IPK SYMPOSIUM ON THE PERIODICAL to organizer Meghan Forbes, Visiting Scholar at the Institute for Public Knowledge no later than Friday, February 3rd, 2017.

    Supported by the Institute for Public Knowledge, Center for the Humanities and the Department of Media, Culture, and Communication at NYU, in partnership with Public Books, the DeWitt Wallace Periodical Room at the New York Public Library, the Zine Library at Barnard College, and the Museum of Modern Art Library.

  • CFP: Gender and Sexuality in Russia, Eastern Europe and Eurasia: Past and Present

    CFP: Gender and Sexuality in Russia, Eastern Europe and Eurasia: Past and Present
    Conference venue: University of Nottingham
    Deadline for submitting abstracts: 9th January 2017

    Description of the Event
    Research into gender and sexuality in Russian, East European and Eurasian contexts has rapidly expanded in recent years in the disciplines of history, geography, sociology, literature, politics and cultural studies. The aim of this conference is to facilitate the continued development of this field by encouraging cross-disciplinary conversations around these central themes.

    Eligible topics for the conference
    Presentations by postgraduates and early-career researchers are especially welcomed. Possible themes may include, but are not limited to:

    Paid and unpaid labour
    Constructions of femininity and masculinity in politics and popular culture
    The life cycle and the regulation of ageing
    Medicine and gendered bodies
    Intersections of gender, race and ethnicity
    Sexualities and gender identities
    Migration and displacement
    Violence and discrimination

    Keynote speaker: Dr Sarah Badcock, University of Nottingham

    Guidelines for submission
    Proposals for 20-minute papers and for panels of 3 papers are welcomed.
    Please send abstracts of 250 words and a brief biographical note to the organiser Siobhan Hearne siobhan.hearne@nottingham.ac.uk by Monday 9th January 2017.

    For more information: http://www.pecob.eu/Gender-Sexuality-Russia-Eastern-Europe-Eurasia-Past-Present

  • CFP: The Burlington Magazine - Russian Art and Artists

    CFP: The Burlington Magazine - Russian Art and Artists

    The Burlington Magazine is seeking submissions of articles on Russian art for forthcoming issues of the Magazine. Priority will be given to articles devoted to art produced after 1800.

    The Burlington Magazine has a long history of scholarship on art from all periods, from Antiquity to the present day. We are seeking submissions of up to 5,000 words of articles that present new research on Russian art.

    For a full set of submission guidelines, please see our website: www.burlington.org.uk/submit-an-article

    If you have any questions regarding article submissions, please contact Martha Barratt barratt@burlington.org.uk in the Editorial Office.

  • CFP: Miscellanea Posttotalitariana Wratislaviensia

    CFP: Miscellanea Posttotalitariana Wratislaviensia

    We would like to invite you to submit articles to Miscellanea Posttotalitariana Wratislaviensia, a peer-reviewed scholarly journal published by the Interdisciplinary Research Center for Post-totalitarian Studies of the Institute of Slavic Studies (University of Wroclaw, Poland) and indexed in Czasopisma Naukowe w Sieci (CNS), The Central European Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities (CEJSH), and Cambridge Scientific Abstracts (CSA, ProQuest). We are seeking for essays and reviews for an issue on Post-communist Children’s Culture in Central, Eastern, and Southeast Europe, which will be devoted to mapping new phenomena in children’s literature and media culture that have emerged during the transition from late communism to late capitalism. As Anikó Imre argues in Globalization and the Transformation of Media Cultures in the New Europe (2009), children from Central, Eastern, and Southeast Europe are post-communist subjects for whom communism is an inherited memory, whose perspectives, values and skills differ from those of older generations, and whose subjectivities are developing in the shadow of adults’ anxieties about this divide. As sources of knowledge and social capital, children’s cultural products both reflect and attempt to resolve tensions caused by the formation of new individual and collective subjectivities. Exploration of regional, European and global affiliations shaping contemporary children’s culture in post-communist Europe offers a vital contribution to a broader inquiry into processes of cultural change and their significance for the formation of national identity in post-totalitarian countries. Contributions are welcomed from a range of fields, such as popular culture, new media, games, literature, education, and childhood.

    Possible areas of investigation:
    -reflective and restorative nostalgia for communist children’s entertainment vs. technoeuphoria, neoliberalism, and the celebration of transnational mobility -childhood heritage -globalization vs. localization -children’s culture and Eurocentric values (e.g. the “Catching up with Europe” project, a pan-European democracy, the EuropaGO project) -children’s relations with interactive media, peer-to-peer technologies and participatory culture -edutainment vs. centralized, nationalized and literature-based education -children’s culture and citizenship education -nationalisms, ethnocentrism, homophobia, misogyny, racism, and xenophobia in children’s culture -relations between children’s and adult media cultures -children’s books markets -promotion of children’s literature and culture

    Essay should be sent to Justyna Deszcz-Tryhubczak and Mateusz Świetlicki by 10th April 2017. Submissions should be 5000-6000 words. We will aim to reply to authors by 20th April 2017, with the aim of arranging reviews and completing revisions for 15th June and publication by the end of 2017. Please keep in mind that the essays must satisfy the formal requirements provided below.

    Guest Editors
    Dr. Justyna Deszcz-Tryhubczak (Institute of English Studies, University of Wroclaw) and Dr. Mateusz Świetlicki (Institute of Slavic Studies, University of Wroclaw)

    GUIDELINES FOR AUTHORS

    -The submitted text must be accompanied by an abstract and title of the article (max. 150 words); five key words; a biographical note (affiliation; title or degree; position held; research interests; current work address and email – max. 80 words). -The name(s) and affiliation(s) of the author(s) should be listed in the upper left-hand corner of the first page:

    Marianna Zacharska

    Uniwersytet Jagielloński (Kraków, Polska)

    Formatting and Style Guide:

    a) Standard printout: 30 lines per page; 60 characters per line (1800 characters with spaces per page); justified text; margins: top, bottom – 2,5; left – 3,5, right – 1,5
    b) font: Times New Roman in 12 point size.
    c) title of the article – centered, font – 14 point size.
    d) spacing: 1,5 in the main text; single spaced in the footnotes.
    e) titles of literary works cited in the text for the first time should be accompanied by the original title (not in transliteration) and the date of publication in parentheses; titles of literary works should be italicized (do not use quotation marks).
    f) quotations should be given in the original language (not in transliteration); longer quotations (more than 40 words) should be set apart from the surrounding text, in block format, indented from the left margin, and single spaced; font: 10 point size.
    g) names appearing in the text for the first time should be given in full.

    FOOTNOTES should be placed at the bottom of the page on which the reference appears. Use continuous footnote numbering.

    a) bibliographic description in the footnotes should be given in the original language; please follow the examples:
    a. Book:
    J. Smith, History, Warsaw 2009, p. 25.
    Ibidem, s. 15.
    J. Smith, History, op. cit., p. 37.

    b. Excerpts from publications of the same author:

    M. Shamone, Rap Culture, [in:] eadem, The History of Music, New York 2012, pp. 67-98.

    Ibidem, p. 75.

    M. Shamone, Rap Culture, op. cit., p. 90.

    c. Chapter in a collective work:

    M. Blake, Feminism and Masculinity, trans. by I. Kurz, [in:] Gender Studies, ed. A. Johnes et al. introduction by M. Sahara, London 2008, pp. 109-117.

    d. Journal article:

    E. Noovy, Jane Austen and Romanticisms „English Studies” 2006, no. 1, pp. 32-73.

    e. Online journal article:

    A. Adams, American History, „SSHA” 14 July 2013 [http://tssha.com/Society/69385/PrintView – accessed: 20.01.20013].

    BIBLIOGRAPHY/REFERENCE LIST:

    Reference list or bibliography should be included at the end of the text.
    The word bibliography should be in bold and aligned to the left. Font: Times New Roman in 12 point size.
    List the sources in alphabetical order by the authors’ last names.
    All sources must be justified and 1.5–spaced. Font: Times New Roman in 12 point size.
    Use: The Chicago Manual of Style

  • CFP: ARTMargins Online

    CFP: ARTMargins Online

    CFP: ARTMargins Online

    Interested in writing about contemporary art practice in Eastern Europe, Russia, or the former Soviet Union?

    ARTMargins Online accepts previously unpublished interviews, essays, reviews/review articles, blogs, podcasts and videos devoted to contemporary art, with a focus on the region formerly known as Eastern Europe.

    Please address submissions and all other correspondence to the managingeditor@artmargins.com

    For more information on ARTMargins Online go to: www.artmargins.com