News

  • EXH: Hot Art in a Cold War - Exhibition and Programming

    EXH: Hot Art in a Cold War - Exhibition and Programming

    Hot Art in a Cold War: Intersections of Art and Science in the Soviet Era
    January 27, 2018 - May 20, 2018
    Opening on January 27, 2018, the Bruce Museum’s provocative new exhibition Hot Art in a Cold War: Intersections of Art and Science in the Soviet Era examines one of the dominant concerns of Soviet unofficial artists—and citizens everywhere—during the Cold War: the consequences of innovation in science, technology, mathematics, communications, and design. Juxtaposing art made in opposition to state-sanctioned Socialist Realism with artifacts from the Soviet nuclear and space programs, Hot Art in a Cold War touches upon the triumphs and tragedies unleashed as humankind gained the power to both leave the Earth and to destroy it.

    Produced from the 1960s to the 1980s, the works on view address themes of international significance during a turbulent period marked by the ever-escalating competition for nuclear supremacy and the space race. Creative interpretations of these key historical events and their repercussions are presented here through nearly 40 works by 17 artists from the former Soviet republics of Estonia, Latvia, Ukraine, and Russia.

  • The Art and Science of Museums

    The Art and Science of Museums

    The program “The Art and Science of Museums” is hosted by the Hermitage Educational Center in St. Petersburg, Russia.

    Program Dates: June 17 - July 7, 2018 Application Deadline: March 1, 2018 Cost: $3,995 Includes: Tuition, dormitory accommodation, insurance, Russian visa, airport transfers, transcript of studies.

    Russia’s rich cultural heritage is complimented by a unique emphasis that Russians place on history and education. This has helped Russia produce one of the world’s most extensive museum systems, one well-known not only for impressive collections but also thematic versatility, multiplicity of display modes, and sheer number of institutions. With private and public support, many of Russia’s museums are being modernized and new museums are being established. Russians have also supported this as some of the world’s most avid museum enthusiasts.

    The Art and Science of Museums seeks to understand the Russian museum phenomenon and covers wide subject matter. Topics include: the history of collecting, the “museumification” of historic and cultural sites, museum operations (e.g. storage facilities, restoration labs, exhibition curation, education, and development), integration of technology and interactivity, and museum educational work.

    The Art and Science of Museums is for students looking to understand how cultural and historical heritage can be best preserved and transmitted. Over an intensive three weeks in beautiful St. Petersburg, Russia, we will take a behind-the-scenes look at the Hermitage Museum, and explore a plethora of others including educational museums at schools of higher learning, scientific museums, museums of ethnography, memorial apartment museums, literary museums, political history museums, and more.

    For more information and how to apply, please visit: http://www.sras.org/study_art_museums_russia

  • SHERA December 2017 Election Results

    We are pleased to announce the results of the December 2017 SHERA elections and warmly welcome the following individuals to the SHERA Board. Congratulations! We look forward to working with you.

    Members-at-large (2 year term)

    Hanna Chuchvaha Nic Iljine Natalia Kolodzei Andrey Shabanov

    Secretary-Treasurer (2 year term)

    Alice Isabella Sullivan

    Web News Editor (1 year term)

    Corina L. Apostol

    Thank you to the SHERA dues-paying members who voted.

    Sincerely, SHERA Officers

    Eva Forgacs, President Karen Kettering, Vice-President/President-Elect Ksenia Nouril, Secretary-Treasurer Yelena Kalinsky, Listserv Administrator Corina L. Apostol, Web News Editor Anna P. Sokolina, SHERA-SAH Liaison

  • OPP: CEC ArtsLink, St. Petersburg, Russia

    April 1 - December 31, 2018

    The ArtsLink Back Apartment Residency program provides opportunities for international artists and curators to conduct research, create new work, collaborate with the local arts community, and create special projects in St. Petersburg, Russia. Each month residency is individually designed to enable visiting artists and curators to learn about the Russian arts community, develop their own work, and share information about their work and other cultures with local audiences.

    The ArtsLink Back Apartment invites artists and curators interested in learning about contemporary art in Russia and building relationships with the local arts community. Though preference is given to artists and curators working in the fields of socially engaged art and public art, artists working in other fields are also welcome to apply.

    CEC ArtsLink currently funds residencies by artists and curators from the United States. CEC ArtsLink will provide international travel, visa support (if needed), accommodation, and per diem. Artists from other countries are welcome to apply, but will need to seek financial support to cover their expenses. CEC ArtsLink will provide lodging at the residency space.

    Interested artists and curators can apply by completing the on-line application form. Applications will be available online from October 23 and accepted until December 15, 2017 (for residencies between April 1 and December 31, 2018, the residency is closed in August).

    Duration of the Residency for artists is 1 month, and for curators is 7-10 days. Back Apartment Residency Awards will be announced by February 1, 2018.

    For more information, please contact Liza Matveeva, Residency Coordinator at mailto:lmatveeva@cecartslink.org and check our website: http://www.cecartslink.org

    The CEC ArtsLink Back Apartment Residency program is funded by the Kettering Family Philanthropies and Trust for Mutual Understanding

  • CFP: Call for SHERA-sponsored Session Proposals

    CFP: Call for SHERA-sponsored Session Proposals

    SHERA invites our members to submit session proposals for a SHERA-sponsored session at the Society of Architectural Historians SAH 72nd Annual International Conference in Providence RI, April 24-28, 2019. Session proposals should be submitted to the SHERA Board at: [shera.artarchitecture@gmail.com] (shera.artarchitecture@gmail.com) by SHERA deadline - December 10, 2017, and should comply with the instructions found below in the SAH Call for Sessions. The chair (co-chairs) of the selected proposal will be notified ASAP, for timely submission on the SAH website.

    The individual proposing a SHERA-sponsored session must follow the same selection process for SAH conference sessions proposed by organizations as those proposed by individuals. Acceptance is not guaranteed. A Conference session selected by SAH Conference Committee is considered an academic achievement.

    Session proposals must include the following elements:

    1. A session title not longer than 65 characters, including spaces and punctuation
    2. Summary of the subject and the premise in no more than 500 words
    3. Name, professional affiliation (if applicable), address, telephone, and email address (if your session is sponsored by SHERA, you also have to become a SAH member, and ensure that the information you are providing matches an existing SAH profile/membership account to avoid misdirecting communications.
    4. A current CV (2 pages maximum)

    Although the SAH membership is international, the annual conference is conducted in English. Therefore, all session proposals must be submitted in English and, if accepted, conducted in English.

    SAH Call for Sessions SAH 2019 Annual International Conference

    www.sah.org/conferences-and-programs/2019-conference—-providence

    SAH Submission Deadline: January 16, 2018, at 5 pm CST.

    The Society of Architectural Historians will offer a total of 36 paper sessions at its 2019 Annual International Conference in Providence, Rhode Island. The Society invites its members, including graduate students and independent scholars, representatives of SAH chapters and partner organizations, to chair a session at the conference. As SAH membership is required to chair or present research at the annual conference, non-members who wish to chair a session will be required to join SAH next August 2018 when conference registration opens for Session Chairs and Speakers.  
    Since the principal purpose of the SAH annual conference is to inform attendees of the general state of research in architectural history and related disciplines, session proposals covering every time period and all aspects of the built environment, including landscape and urban history, are encouraged.

    Sessions may be theoretical, methodological, thematic, interdisciplinary, pedagogical, revisionist or documentary in premise and ambition and have broadly conceived or more narrowly focused subjects. Sessions that embrace cross-cultural, transnational and/or non-Western topics are particularly welcome. In every case, the subject should be clearly defined in critical and historical terms.

    Since late submissions cannot be considered, it is recommended that proposals be submitted well before the deadline. Last-minute submissions that fail posting in the online portal or are sent in error via email cannot be considered. Only proposals submitted through the online portal can be considered.     To ensure broad participation in the SAH Annual International Conference, individuals are limited to the role of either a session chair OR a speaker. If you are selected as a session chair you may not submit a paper abstract to other sessions to be considered for speaking.
    Each Session Chair and Speaker is expected to fund his or her own travel and related expenses to participate in the conference. A copy of the Session Chair and Speaker Agreement that includes deadlines and step-by-step processes will be distributed to both Session Chairs and Speakers. Session Chairs and Speakers are required to join SAH and pre-register for the conference starting in August 2018.

    SAH Key Dates October 03, 2017, 3 pm CDT - Call for sessions opens January 16, 2018, 5 pm CST - Deadline to submit a session proposal February 23, 2018 - Session selection notification March 9, 2018, 5 pm CDT - Revised session proposals due April 3, 2018, 3 pm CDT - Call for papers opens June 5, 2018, 5 pm CDT - Deadline to submit a paper abstract June 7, 2018 - Session Chairs start reviewing paper submissions July 13, 2018 - Session Chairs make final selection of papers and notify speakers August 1, 2018 - Session Chair & Speaker registration opens September 27, 2018 - Session Chair & Speaker registration closes

  • SHERA: Emerging Scholar Prize Awarded

    SHERA: Emerging Scholar Prize Awarded

    The SHERA Emerging Scholar Prize was awarded to Christina E. Crawford (Emory University) for her article “From Tractors to Territory: Socialist Urbanization through Standardization,” Journal of Urban History (January 2018).

    The jury consisted of Carolyn C. Guile, Janet Kennedy, Juliet Koss, Marie Alice L’Heureux, and Colleen McQuillen.

    Jury commendation: Rigorously researched and theoretically astute, Christina Crawford’s essay “From Tractors to Territory: Socialist Urbanization through Standardization” (Journal of Urban History) is the Award Committee’s unanimous choice for the First Annual SHERA Emerging Scholars’ Essay Prize. Examining the design and construction of both the Kharkiv Tractor Factory (1930-31) and the neighboring planned city for its workers, Crawford details the importation of a Fordist model of industrial standardization into a Soviet context and demonstrates how the concept of priviazka, taken from contemporaneous architectural discourse, was productively applied to other spheres in order to facilitate rapid growth in manufacturing and distribution. Her essay illuminates the importance of adaptability within the ostensibly standardized design practices that fueled the breakneck tempo of industrialization and urbanization during Stalin’s first Five-Year Plan. Innovative and authoritative, Crawford’s scholarship offers a methodological model for considering the relationship of architectural design and economic development during the process of early Soviet industrialization.

    Next Emerging Scholar Prize deadline: September 30, 2018

  • CONF: post presents “Russian Cosmism: A Work of Art in the Age of Technological Immortality” at the Museum of Modern Art

    CONF: post presents “Russian Cosmism: A Work of Art in the Age of Technological Immortality” at the Museum of Modern Art

    Recent developments in biotechnology, genetics, and artificial intelligence suggest that the ancient myths of eternal youth, immortality, and material resurrection are now a tangible horizon of the technological imagination. At the same time, a century of dreams for travel in cosmic space and life on other planets have coalesced into a new transcendental realm—infinite in size, yet located in the material world, which itself has radically expanded. What are the politics and aesthetics of life in this new world? Already in the late 19th century, Russian philosopher Nikolai Fedorov started considering some of these questions in his philosophy of the common task, which advocated technological immortality, material resurrection for all who had ever lived, and the exploration of outer space. A central tenet of Fedorov’s larger philosophical outlook, known as Russian Cosmism, puts art on par with science, technology, and social organization as an integral force ushering in the new world. Fedorov’s ideas inspired numerous artists, writers, and scientists in his lifetime and well after his physical death. Following the October Revolution in 1917, Russian Cosmism became attractive to the materialist philosophy at the core of Communist ideology. This radical vision of everlasting life in the cosmos was particularly important for the Russian avant-garde, which explored the possibilities of new worlds through Suprematism, Constructivism, and other related movements that have been long represented in the collection of The Museum of Modern Art. post presents “Russian Cosmism: A Work of Art in the Age of Technological Immortality” will address the ideas of Russian Cosmism and their relevance to our time. During this one-night symposium, Boris Groys will speak on the biopolitics of technological immortality and resurrection; Arseny Zhilyaev considers the aesthetic ideals of Russian Cosmism including “life building” in collaboration with God; Hito Steyerl will talk about continued quests for the elixir of immortality, euthanasia, and genocide; and Anton Vidokle will present a recent short film called The Communist Revolution Was Caused by the Sun. Boris Groys is a philosopher, essayist, and media theorist. Having taught in Philadelphia, Münster, and Los Angeles, he became Professor of Art History, Philosophy and Media Theory at the Karlsruhe University of Arts and Design in 1994. In 2009, he was appointed Professor of Russian and Slavic Studies at New York University. He has published widely on the subject of the Russian avant-garde and was curator of the exhibition Dream Factory Communism at Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt in 2003–04. Hito Steyerl is a writer and filmmaker. Her works have been exhibited at the 32nd São Paulo Biennial (2016), the 9th Berlin Biennale (2016), the German Pavilion at the 56th Venice Biennale (2015), and Documenta 12 (2007), among other venues and institutions. Anton Vidokle is an artist and editor of e-flux journal. He was born in Moscow and lives in New York and Berlin. Vidokle’s work has been exhibited internationally at Documenta 13 and at the 56th Venice Biennale. His films have been presented at the Centre Pompidou, Paris; Tate Modern, London; Garage Museum, Moscow; Remai Modern, Saskatoon; and others. Arseny Zhilyaev is an artist based in Moscow. In recent works he has examined the legacy of Soviet museology and the museum within Russian Cosmism. Among other writings, he has published articles in e-flux journal. Zhilyaev is editor of Avant-Garde Museology (2015). His works have been shown at the Gwangju Biennale, Liverpool Biennial, and the Ljubljana Triennial, as well as in exhibitions at the Centre Pompidou and Palais de Tokyo, Paris; De Appel, Amsterdam; Kadist Art Foundation, Paris and San Francisco; and the V-A-C Foundation, Moscow.

  • Call for Entries: SHERA Emerging Scholar Prize

    Call for Entries: SHERA Emerging Scholar Prize

    The Society of Historians of Eastern European, Eurasian and Russian Art and Architecture (SHERA) is pleased to announce a call for submissions for the newly-established SHERA Emerging Scholar Prize. The award, to be announced at the Society’s annual meeting at ASEEES, aims to recognize and encourage original and innovative scholarship in the field. Applicants must have published an English-language article in a scholarly print or online journal or museum print or online publication within the preceding twelve-month period. For the 2017 prize, articles published between September 30, 2016 and September 30, 2017 would be eligible. Additionally, applicants are required to have received his or her PhD within the last 5 years (2012 or thereafter for the 2017 prize) and be a member of SHERA in good standing at the time that the application is submitted. The winner will be awarded $500 and republication (where copyright allows) or citation of the article on H-SHERA. Applications should include a CV including contact information (email, mailing address, and telephone) and a copy of the English-language article with header/colophon of the journal or catalogue together with a brief abstract. Applications should be sent to shera.prizes@gmail.com no later than October 15, 2017.

  • The CAA-Getty International Program

    The CAA-Getty International Program, generously supported by the Getty Foundation, provides funding to between fifteen and twenty art historians, museum curators, and artists who teach art history to attend CAA’s Annual Conferences. The goal of the project is to increase international participation in CAA, to diversify the association’s membership, and to foster collaborations between North American art historians, artists, and curators and their international colleagues.

    Since it began in 2012, the program has brought ninety scholars to the conferences, from forty-one countries located in Central and Eastern Europe, Russia, Asia, Southeast Asia, Africa, the Caribbean, and South America. Each year, a preconference colloquium on international topics in art history inaugurates the week, kicking off four days of conference sessions, meetings with new colleagues, and visits to museums and galleries. Subsequent to these events, the program has generated many scholarly collaborations, including publications, conferences, and exhibitions.

    In 2017, CAA organized a reunion to celebrate five successful years of the CAA-Getty International Program. Twenty alumni were selected to present papers at the Annual Conference in New York, held February 15-18, 2017. Organized into four sessions about international topics in art history, these Global Conversations were chaired by distinguished scholars from the United States and featured presentations by the CAA-Getty alumni. The papers from these sessions are now archived on the CAA website.

    ABOUT THE 2018 GRANT

    The 2018 CAA-Getty International Program will support fifteen art historians, museum curators, and artists who teach art history to attend the 106th Annual Conference, taking place in Los Angeles from February 21–24, 2018. The grant covers travel expenses, hotel accommodations for seven nights, per diems, conference registrations, and one-year CAA memberships. The program will include a one-day preconference colloquium on international issues in art history, to be held at the Getty Center on February 14, at which grant recipients will present and discuss their common professional interests and issues. Attendance at the preconference is limited and by invitation only. This year the grant also will fund five alumni from the CAA-Getty International Program to participate in the preconference colloquium and speak at a session during the conference. As they have in previous years, representatives from CAA’s membership will host program participants during the conference week.

    ARE YOU ELIGIBLE?

    Applicants must be practicing art historians who teach at a university or work as a curator in a museum, or artists who teach art history. They must have a good working knowledge of English and be available to participate in CAA events from February 21–24, 2018. Only professionals who have not attended a CAA conference previously, and who are from countries underrepresented in CAA’s membership are eligible to apply. The grant excludes scholars from Western Europe and Australia, whose countries are well represented in CAA. It further excludes scholars who have received funds from American foundations or research institutes to participate in conferences or residencies in the United States. Applicants do not need to be CAA members. This grant program is not open to graduate students or to those participating in the 2018 conference as chairs, speakers, or discussants.

    HOW TO APPLY

    Please review the application specifications and complete the application form. If you have questions about the process or are unsure of your eligibility, please email Janet Landay, project director of the CAA-Getty International Program.
    Applications should include:

    A completed application form A two-page version of the applicant’s CV A letter of recommendation from the chair, dean, or director of the applicant’s school, department, or museum Please send all application materials as Word or PDF files to Janet Landay no later than Monday, August 21, 2017. CAA will notify applicants by Monday, October 2, 2017.

  • EXH: In Edenia, a City of the Future

    EXH: In Edenia, a City of the Future

    In Edenia, a City of the Future June 8 – July 9, 2017 Opening: June 8, 18.00

    In Edenia, a City of the Future is an art exhibition inspired by a Yiddish language utopian novella of the same name, published by Kalman Zingman in Kharkiv in 1918. Nearly one hundred years later, artist Yevgeniy Fiks invited an international group of contemporary artists to read the novella and create an artwork as if from the museum of the imaginary city of Edenia. The exhibition presents the artists’ different visions as an invitation to look at our dreams from various angles, to take note of their colors, intonations, forms and rhythms.

    Zingman’s Edenia (a projection of Kharkiv 25 years into the future) is serviced by “aerotrains” and fountains that keep the temperature at a comfortable level yearround; it is a place where ethnic communities live side-by-side in peace and harmony. The protagonist of the story, returned to his native city from Palestine, makes a stop in the art museum: “He … looked at the figure sculptures of Kritsenshteyn, Lisitski and Roza Fayngold, then he went to the top level. The door closed behind him, and he looked for a very long time, thought for a long time, and got lost in his ruminations.”

    At a time when many Ukrainians are divided in their respective idealizations of the Soviet past as a golden era of social justice or the European Union as the promise of a future utopia, “In Edenia, a City of the Future” (based on a novella written in a language that has practically disappeared from Ukraine) invites the public to examine the country’s multicultural history and its early Soviet dreams/nightmares in light of present-day political challenges and potentialities. We urge visitors to think critically about the appeal and comfort of a utopian dream, while simultaneously remembering past actions taken in the name of making an ideal image of society a reality. How many of these dreams and arguments are we still repeating today?

    At the same time, we acknowledge the utopian nature of the very project of 21stcentury contemporary art, where visibility (as revelation) has come to replace the visionary projects of the past.

    Curators: Larissa Babij (Ukraine / US) and Yevgeniy Fiks (US / Russia)

    Participating Artists: Ifeoma Anyaeji (Nigeria) Babi Badalov (France / Azerbaijan) Concrete Dates Collective (Ukraine) Curandi Katz (Italy / Canada) Sasha Dedos (Ukraine) Aikaterini Gegisian (UK / Greece) Tatiana Grigorenko (US / France) Creolex centr (Ruthie Jenrbekova & Maria Vilkovisky) (Kazakhstan) Nikita Kadan (Ukraine) Kapwani Kiwanga (Canada / France) Yuri Leiderman (Ukraine / Germany) Mykola Ridnyi (Ukraine) Haim Sokol (Russia / Israel) Agnès Thurnauer (France / Switzerland) Exhibition designer: Ivan Melnychuk (Ukraine) Publishing partner: STAB (School of Theory and Activism – Bishkek) (Kyrgyzstan) Supported by Asylum Arts Special thanks to Dr. Gennadiy Estraikh

    Open Tuesday–Sunday, 12.00 – 20.00 Yermilov Center Svobody Square, 4 Kharkiv, Ukraine Tel: +380 95 801 30 83, +380 57 760 47 13 www.yermilovcentre.org

    The exhibition will involve several public events, including guided tours with the exhibition curators, meetings with participating artists, and a talk with American historian Mayhill C. Fowler, a scholar of the multi-ethnic history of the early Ukrainian SSR and author of “Beau Monde on Empire’s Edge : State and Stage in Soviet Ukraine.” Please check www.yermilovcentre.org for details.

    About the curators: Yevgeniy Fiks is a Russian-American artist, who has been living and working in New York since 1994. His artistic practice, which includes making artworks, exhibitions, books, often seeks out and explores repressed micro-historical narratives that highlight the complex relationships between social histories of the West and the Soviet bloc in the 20th century. To learn more, please see http://yevgeniyfiks.com/

    Larissa Babij grew up in the USA and has been living and working in Kyiv as an independent curator, writer and translator since 2005. Her work focuses on the representation of Ukrainian contemporary artists in the English-speaking world, organizing contemporary art projects (usually in collaboration with artists) in Ukraine, and critical discussion of current cultural conditions.